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, not so many times, but the last one i was here, and that was because a pope died. john paul ii died after living his last years infirmed and in visible pain. now we have a transition, we have a living pope. you're not watching a funeral before the next pope is elected. you're not watching the world's heads of state come here to pay their respects to the departed pope. you're seeing a much different kind of transition. john al whlen, what is pope benedict going to do the rest of the day? >> normally the wednesday audience, the pope gives religious instruction rooted in scripture. but today i would imagine that knowing the momentous nature of what's happening, it's probably going to be uncharacteristically personal for benedict. i will imagine he will talk about what was in his mind and in his heart as he reached this remarkable decision to step as sight and what his hopes for the church are going forward. >> and high school a moment of opportunity and possibility, many saying this needs to be a moment for reform. what kind of reform do you think needs to happen? of course in our minds are
. >> and john paul would have been. >> a movie star. >> that gives you a sense of the different temperaments. yet the emotion that is now being really demonstrated as these cardinals say farewell face to face for the last time, all of them kissing the fisherman's ring which we know will be defaced and destroyed which benedict xvi's papacy ends. >> that's right. there are two instruments of the papal office, one is the ring and one is the official papal seal. the seal is kept in a safe in an office in the vatican. of course in the middle ages as you know, christiane be these were what were used to stamp paper bulls. which made them official. after a papacy had ended, someone might use the instruments to falsify papal documents. that's where the custom of destroying them came from. that will be honored at the end of benedict's papacy as well. >> thank you. we'll continue to watch this with all of you. back to you, john and zoraida in new york. >> it is interesting to see this as history is being made at the vatican. pope benedict xvi saying good-bye to the cardinals who have assembled and many
benedict who stepped in and became pope after pope john paul ii, the iconic pope of the 20th century, stepped down. of course, pope john paul ii had been pope since 1979. and so, of course, his impact felt not only in the religious world but also the political world. pope benedict, though, never really, of course, given the chance to emerge from the shadows. and it seems that for a good bit of his time, he was dogged by allegations that came through the child abuse scandal throughout certainly before his reign. he was constantly being dogged by questions regarding that. but mark halperin, an iconic figure replaced by pope benedict who has had a very short tenure and now is stepping down in a way that a lot of popes don't step down before they die. >> short tenure, and it's going to be scrutinized for some of the issues you raised. to me now thinking forward, it's going to be a very big story for catholics and others around the world including the question of will it be another european? there's going to be pressure to look to another region of the country as there was last time. i th
pope john paul died and then when the next conclave elected pope benedict xvi. this pope is deeply loved by the very sincere and devoted and devout roman catholics, but he's considered more of a professor, more of a theologian, more of an intellectual, someone who was more of an intellectual than pope john paul. >> any idea when the conclave will begin to select the new pope? they're all there. >> reporter: they are pretty much all here, and they had a time to gather at his resignation, which was announced a couple weeks ago. they're not all here yet, and we understand that the first formal meeting of all the cardinals will happen on monday, and only then will they decide what date to actually establish the first day of the conclave, and at that point those cardinals who are eligible to vote will start their secret deliberations. we're not sure when. we're told somewhere potentially around the 9th, 10th, 11th of march. >> christiane, i appreciate it. >>> he's been stripped of public duties after thousands of pages, thousands of pages of internal church documents revealed his role a
, will it be a pope outside of europe? there hasn't been an italian pope since before john paul ii, who is polish and then we had our german pope with pope benedict. could it be an african pope, latin pope, a younger pope, and also a pope that could lead the church out of these sex abuse scandals. >> what's the possibility of it being a pope with a bit more diversity? >> it's quite likely. it could happen. but it's always been difficult to predict who the next pope will be. and often times the predictions run afoul. they turn out not to be correct. >> okay. so how does the catholic church -- how does the vatican then shake this bad press? and to move forward, to look for the next pope? >> well, i think that the cardinals who are tasked with the selection of the next pope have a big task. and they will be sequestered in the sistine chapel, and they will, according to the rules, pray and try to select the next pope through prayer, politicking is looked down upon. but before they go into the chapel, they hear two sermons about the future of the church and what the next pope should be attending to. s
benedict is no longer the pope, he has to give up the shoes but remember, john paul ii wore the red shoes for a couple weeks early on in his pontificate, then wore brown ones. the pope can really do what he wants. he's the supreme pontiff, the supreme ruler of the church and he kind of can make the rules himself and benedict made these himself today. >> interesting. although as you said, raymond, i say this, you know, can't change the doctrine, right? you do everything. >> can't do that. he can protect the doctrine but not amend it. >> let me talk about one other thing. he wears a ring, fisherman's ring. describe it to me and why he's going to actually destroy it. it looks kind of fluorescent green or yellow on his finger. >> now, this goes back to 1265. pope clement iv referenced this ring in one of his letters to a nephew. it is the sign and seal of his office. when you look closely, you are seeing a picture there, it is a bas relief of st. peter leaning over the edge of the boat pulling in fish. this shows and indicates that the pope, whoever wears this ring, is the successor of st. pe
to meet the pope then john paul the 2nd. then what happened happened and my mother found herself representing bill clinton to the pope. >> how exciting for her. >> it was a challenge. >> i guess it was. >> e.j. this morning quotes somebody who says the most noted earnize i earnizing -- modernizing thing this pope did was to retire, get out of the way. could it be at this modern age a pope just can't afford to be seen frail and weakened in the 24/7 news cycle? are we moving beyond the days? >> i don't think that's necessarily true. john paul felt strongly he wanted the world to see him in a sickened state because that was humanity. that he was setting an example of someone who was frail and feeble and carrying on. i think this pope, you know, has decided to set a different example. we'll see what this precedent means. does it mean future popes have to be pushed out? does he have influence after a new pope is manamed? we're in unchartered waters. >> and in quite a while, we'll see -- >> they have their own camp david. >> with the choicloisted nuns. they'll probably get better food.
remember how pope john paul ii was so young when he was elected. i think he was 56 or 57. a young man. >> he used to go skiing all the time. >> he was elected when he was 78 years old. >> yeah. so we watched him turn into an elderly man that was very frail. remember how long it took, we waited and waited. i can remember i was on a plane when he finally passed. but he didn't -- i mean, he was not healthy at the end and he didn't resign. so that's what i don't really understand, ross, right? >> well, traditionally, they haven't resigned. so -- >> 1415, yeah. >> so he's 2005, he's 86. so that's five, six, seven, eight -- >> i think what we're all dancing around the issue of whether or not there's more to it, right? is that what we're getting at? >> is there something else we don't know about. >> all of them have gotten elderly and they have essentially died in office and that's when they begin to look for a new pope. that is no happening in this case. >> right. you said it would be pure speculation. it's probably best not to specula speculate, at least you filled us in that at this point
, john allen, who's one of the more perceptive ones. he said the legacy of john paul ii we're not going to fully appreciate until years from now and one of benedict's main job is going to be to help us unpack that ponticate. so they're going to be voluminous but it will take a while. i can rattle a few off. >> reporter: give me two. >> i would say the deep theological pro fundity than been expressed with amazing clarity and child-like simplicity. and second i would say his constant call that the church needs to be engaged with the world in culture. you know, christiane, there's some voices in the church today saying we need to retreat to the cat combs. we need to circle the wagons. ben xvi said the church is in the world. there's tons more if you ever want to invite me back. we'll go through his accomplishments. thank you, good to be with you. >> reporter: cardinal dolan, thank you very much for joining us. back to you, chris and erin. >> what a great interview, first of all. kudos for christiane. for people watching all over the world, you just got a look at what makes cardinal dolan s
back in november, right? >> that's right. and when john paul ii when he was introduced to him by benedict he said i assure you he's made his first communion, he's so young. that's the comment that benedict made to john paul ii. why i'm interested in talking a bit about him is because he's so humble. when he was bishop in the philippines, he would ride his bicycle. he would encounter all the pool on the streets. he would invite the poor in his residence to eat. there's a story about a woman who was looking for her alcoholic out-of-work husband expecting to find him in the local bar, she found him in the residence with the bishop eating lunch. he spoke very vo shumbly at thet meeting that we need someone with a lot of humbleness and silence. people are saying, wow, wouldn't it be something. he's no slouch, he studied in america, summa cum laude . >> many people said it might be an opportunity to have an african as pope, and cardinal peter turksa of ghana. >> a few strikes against him, one he's already spoken about it to the press -- >> like the cia, forget it. >> he didn't say i
okay yesterday to me and predecessor pope john paul survived two assassination attempts, various cancer scares, crippling arthritis, and you had parkinson's as well. yet he battled on for 27 years. it does seem on the face of it very strange that pope benedict would walk away amid all the scandals being told and in the media of a secret gaye network of clergy inside the vatican, the financial mismanagement and the firing of archbishop cardinal keith o'brien of inappropriate behavior towards priests in the '80s. when you put it altogether, where are we left, do you think? >> i take the pope on his word. he is 85 years of age. his health is declining. he knows his health is going to continue to decline. i am not surprised. modern medicine can keep us physically alive long after we can do the kind of job that it requires to be, to have the strength, the mental ability to do that kind of job, so it was inevitable that sometime during the 21st century we have a pope resign for a reason like this. now, you know, with regards to all of these scandals and stories that are in the italian press,
of information 2005 when pope john paul died and as we watched the election of pope benedict xvi. obviously it had already come out in the unite and there are lots of reports but hadn't exploded in europe. i'm talking to vatican insiders and watchers who say this may explode in other parts of the world as well, that it is a bit of a ticking timebomb. in that regard, it is different. clearly the church is really -- they just simply can't believe that all these headlines are happening the very final week of pope benedict's reign. so they're desperately trying to get out from under this deluge of bad news and hope at least the next two days are going to be much more devoted to the final religious tasks of pope benedict. tomorrow he has his final general audience. they've handed out tens of thousands of tickets. st. peter's square behind me is going to be filled. there's going to be the traditional popemobile circular around st. peter's square. then the gradual ceremonial steps that are going to be taken before pope benedict xvi leave. but unprecedented in this way and, of course, because this
. i was here when pope john paul ii died in 2005, and it was completely different atmosphere. on this occasion, very much an opportunity for people, the faithful, to come and contemplate the legacy of pope benedict. many appreciated him as a teacher, a thinker, an intellectual. somebody who had the courage to confront many of the issues that have plagued the church over the last decade or so. the question of, for instance, pedophilia and the priesthood and other things. very much what they heard from people is they appreciated him as someone who faced and grappled with serious issues and appreciated the fact that he had the courage to step down at this point in his life. >> ben wedeman for thus morning. thank you for the update. you can hear them breaking down from the mass said a little bit this morning. here is what will happen from now on from here. pope benedict xvi has amended the conclave law. they don't have to wait for 16 days after the papacy is vacant. cardinals under the age of 80 will take part. four ballots a day. b ballots get counted twice daily. and dark smoke
who will be voting were appointed either by john paul ii or benedict xvi and on the big picture issues they are all of one mind. i think it's quite unlikely the next pope is going to ordain women or repeal church teaching on abortion or gay marriage or those kinds of issues. now on the other hand, i would certainly say from my own experience of talking to cardinals the more thoughtful among them realize the church has a woman's problem. they understand there are a lot of sisters who feel the same way as our guest does and it's not just nuns, lots of women generally feel that way. i think the next pope will face this difficult challenge of trying to reach out to women and assuring them there's a place for them in the church while at the same time drawing a line in the sand on the ordinary nation question. >> when you say that they're going to select the new pope and they're going to think outside the box and they're maybe going to south america or africa to choose the next pope, they're really not thinking outside the box though, are they? maybe they are in picking a pope from another c
and into his studies. he goes on short walks, but he unlike john paul ii was not for long hikes. >> thank you very much. here in the united states, american catholics are divided on the future of their church. catholi catholic split from what they want. 46% want change and the pape as tow go in a new direction. 51% said stay traditional. live from new york is the host of the busted halo show on the catholic channel on sirius fm. welcome. as we were pointing out potential next popes, me three things you want to see in this next leader. >> because we refer to the hope as the vicker of christ, the epicentative of our lord jesus christ on earth, he has to be a man who reminds us of our lord jesus. can you say sure, a lot of believers do that. you don't have to be the pope to do that, but to show the compassion and the love and the mercy of jesus christ is one. another would be at this time in our church's history, we need a unifier. there is a lot of division not only around the world, not only here in the united states, but even within the burocracy of the workings of the vatican. we heard that
the last pope, one that we knew growing up, pope john paul ii, literally allowed the world to watch him die. that was part of the process of sharing life, willie. >> yeah. this pope says he's old and fragile, unable to travel, but you make a good point about the previous pope. john, we've heard many times now that the next pope, whoever that may be, will have to confront the sexual abuse scandal, puts it mildly. that has consumed the roman catholic church for so long. what will that mean exactly? what will a pope do? a new pope in terms of confronting that? will he come out immediately in an opening address? will he purge some of the priests? what do you think that pope will do at least from a public relations point of view to change the perception? >> well, it's the perception and the reality. it's the most disturbing thing about any self-protecting institution. you see this as the catholic chump has, for decade upon decade now, put its own institutional survival and its own institutional dignity, really, ahead of the interests of the weakest people in its care, its children. i think many
he addressed you first but he and benedict would chat when benedict was waiting to see pope john paul. >> completely open. >> reporter: what was he like to talk to? >> very -- he would ask me what my interests were and how i felt and how i saw things. >> reporter: and with a sense of humor, like when benedict offered to sign widmer's copy of a book that he written which was pretty thick. >> when i gave it to him he said, you're really reading this? and i said, i'm trying. he said, it helps to do it in small steps. >> reporter: but he also had a personal crisis as a guard, spending his first christmas away from home. john paul helped him through that. >> i sort of had a meltdown and right at that moment he comes out of his apartment and he noticed and he reached out to me and he thanked me for being there and he gave me courage. >> reporter: what were you doing? were you crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: you were? >> i stopped crying but he in theed my red eyes. >> reporter: as for what's to come, the top job isn't what we think. >> the pope is the end of your life. you have to give up all
the memory of benedict's predecessor, john paul ii. have a listen to this. >> people said, if anyone should have resigned, it was he. parkinson parkinson's, couldn't get around. i think it is the image, the visual image of a man incapacitated. people say, well, how much is he really doing that? how much does he have his hands on the pulse of what is happening? >> chris cuomo this morning. father, do you think just straight up do you think his successor might find wisdom in the notion of hanging it up early, maybe set a precedent here? >> i agree with the quotations of the priest. we need a person, a leader, a real leader with good health, a wise man, continuing to train and i agree with benedict sistine and he has few guideline -- very clear, if i don't have the health, spirituality, mentality, and everything, i will resign. and it is simple for us. the doctrine is continuing to be the same. i think it is an example for everybody, the leader, the church, continuing. it is much better. resign now. >> italian popes, think of polish, currently german. looking at the statistics and the numbers
, and he looks frail, looks old, but he seemed to be enjoying himself. john paul ii is very much a more engaging pope and not as much as a private man as benedict xvi is. he will leave here tomorrow around this time, by helicopter, and he will go to castle gandolpho and come back to the vatican in his retirement. he'll go into isolation, he's chosen that for himself. the vatican garden cottage as it were, it's not particularly comfortable, i'm told, i haven't been in, but it is somewhere he can spend his twilight years as it were, and he's 85 years old, let's remember that, in peace and reflecting on where he is, who he is, and how far he's come. today was very much an occasion of reflection for the 100,000 or so people who were here, brooke. it was absolutely amazing. we were up there, right at vatican city there and it was a sense of quiet, even though there are over 100,000 people there, so i say, a time of reflection and peace for so many of the faith. brooke? >> and history being made and now less than 24 hours from now, where you are in rome, becky anderson, my thanks to you. >>>
fiery end, john. >> paul vercammen covering this developing story for us. thank you. >>> we want to move on to the president's state of the union address. the president laying out his vision for a second term. last night, challenging republicans to work with him. the speech seemed to hit home with a majority of americans. 53% had a very positive reaction. 24% somewhat positive and 2% reacted negatively. still, a majority of speech watchers, 53%, do not believe this will lead to more bipartisan cooperation. glass half full, glass half empty. brianna keilar here to talk about the speech. >> i think the polls might be on to something, john. president obama talked a lot about the economy, deficit reduction is lone is not an economic plan and with some echoes of the campaign, he talked about investing in the middle class, through education, clean energy investments, and an increase in the minimum page. economic measures that quite swiftly republicans rejected. >> we can say with renewed confidence that the state of our union is stronger. >> reporter: in the first state of the union address of
the kind of italian curia that is the traditional source of popes until really pope john paul. and i think we'll end up with a similarly conservative pope. >> yeah, reverend al asked me during the commercial break what i thought. not that i would know anything about who's going to be the next pope. but one thing's for certain. given the last two popes' selection of cardinals throughout the world, they are all invariably quite conservative. so the next pope is going to, more probably than not, be similarly conservative. it's a bag job, the college of cardinals. they have rigged the deck. they have rigged the deck. >> but what you'll have, too -- >> spoken like a true catholic. >> you could have the first african pope. you could have the first latino pope. but ironically, those guys would be very conservative. you know, the growth of the church in africa is a very conservative movement. the same thing in latin america, although there's a bit of a protestant refirmation. he will be very conservative. >> everybody's talking about the possibility of an african pope. i just don't think it's goin
was standing in precisely the same place back in 2005, eight years ago when pope john paul ii died and we went into the conclave which finally produced pope benedict xvi. that took a week and several false starts. when they can't come to a consensus you have the black smoke emanating from that special chimney in st. peter's and then finally the white smoke and then you don't even know who it is until the archbishop deacon cardinals deacon comes to the window and announces a new pope and only after that the new pope comes to the within to and is greeted. but that was still at least two weeks away. at least tweaks away from that being finalized. >> is the italian media still all over the scandals that are going on involving sex and intrigue, all that stuff that we've seen in those rome newspapers over the past few days, or have they moved on? >> well, they pretty much moved on. that of course was a big story over the weekend and into monday, the beginning of this week. as you can imagine it drove the vatican mad. they were really angry, angry with the press for writing about it, angry for people
of language. after john paul ii it's now taken for granted that the pope shubd a master of many language s. you also look for skill and organization. the pope manages a large bureaucracy. there's a great need for reform of that. but i go back primarily, someone who is an effective evangelizer in today's society. >> first off, cardinal francis arinze. >> i would be surprised if he is elected pope just given his age. pope benedict was 78 when he was elected now is resigning because of old age. cardinal arinze is already 80. he is a bit of a television personality, especially in the english speaking world, he has become well known. very articulate. charming, funny man. he is also involved in the interreligious dialogue for many years, which would make him an attractive figure. >> cardinal peter terkurkson is getting a lot of attention. age 64, so not a problem there. >> yeah. he speaks perfect english, has a sense of the international church. he is also the head of the council for peace and justice. very involved in economic and political issues, but leans a bit left in terms of the mainstray
think he's said that? john reed has said that and paul volcker and many people who you spend time with. >> are you asking me why -- >> what do you think is -- >> well, paul volcker actually said something slightly different as you know. he has advocated the volcker rule, and i don't know the volcker rule, what it means, because nobody's defined it yet. and the reason, as you know, is that it is a very -- it is a line that will only be ultimately arbitrary. so, it's an issue that a lot of people engage with. i'll stick with what i said a moment ago. the focus is right. >> right. >> the focus of too big to fail is right. we had fannie mae and freddie mac. the question of how to address it i think is massively more complicated than these kinds of relatively in my opinion, limited proposals. >> right. >> i'll just say once again, i think it's really important, if you're going to get into this question of too big to fail, you have to try to figure out, if i take the risk away from here, where is that risk going to go and how do i deal with that? and i don't think anybody's come up with a go
of the most celebrated after-parties in the world. paul vercammen has more on that. >> reporter: from the governor's ball. to the "vanity fair" party. to elton john's famous fund-raiser, hollywood knows how to let loose on oscar night. >> we're able to come here and get our message across and raise money and have a good time at the same time. >> reporter: sir elton and david fernish celebrated their event. heidi klum, nicki minaj and jane lynch were on-hand. >> i thought it was a wonderful show. i loved it. i loved the movies. it was great. >> reporter: across town at the "vanity fair" soiree, sandra bullock, and richard gere, all hit the red carpet before partying it up inside. and presenter, halle berry, revealed what she thought was the biggest surprise of the night. >> ang lee. i thought surprised everybody. but so deserved. i loved "life of pi." >> reporter: at the governor's ball after-party, the night's big winners bumped shoulders with hollywood icons. >> octessica. we're the supercouple. >> what are you going to do tonight? >> i don't know. it depends on what and who is in th
to make of this ted cruz. >> ted cruz was elected by a group of tea party maniacs. i get why rand paul does it another tea party crazy elected by tea party crazies. but john mccain who once was a maverick, you know, the creator of mccain-feingold, somebody who usually is moderate i don't expect that from him. this is just not -- this is just not john mccain behavior. >> it's kind of sick i think what john mccain has done with himself over a couple of different issues but specifically the chuck hagel thing. this was a guy that said chuck hagel would be qualified to serve in any leadership role. i don't get it. mccain looks silly in all of this. >> completely silly. at the end of the day, it makes me big the question like john, mccain what are you thinking? you were such a legend somebody who people applauded and looked up to. you could have had a career like ted kennedy. could have. but you are just squandering it, absolutely, positively squand squandering it. i remember when teddy passed and they had the people on the hill people lining the streets of the arli
this spector of the secretary of defense nominee being held up for personal reasons, as john mccain just said. you've got brennan being held up by rand paul. he says he's going to place a hold on brennan at the cia. jack lew is undergoing questioning now and getting roughed up a bit. and right now his nomination may or may not be held up. what's the republican end game here? it's just not good for the national party brand. >> no, i don't think it is good, joe. and you've seen all this up close before. i think this is just a moment of leverage here. i mean, look. the president's got leverage on his domestic agenda right now. he's used his leverage after the election on taxes. you know, this is some leverage that republicans have to get some questions answered, to send some messages, to fire some shots across the bow. they're doing that. the white house is listening, by the way. it's mostly vice president biden who's talking to some of these more recalcitrant republicans and making sure they get what they need so they can get some of this stuff behind them. issues like benghazi. you know, i don
of fun. >> when we come back, the clock is ticking till midnight. we'll head to washington and ask john harwood about the latest negotiations right after this. later this morning, a cnbc exclusive house chairman paul ryan will be joining us live at 8:00 eastern time. it's the first time we'll be talking to him since the election. first, though, take a look at yesterday's winners and losers. revolutionizing an industry can be a tough act to follow, but at xerox we've embraced a new role. working behind the scenes to provide companies with services... like helping hr departments manage benefits and pensions for over 11 million employees. reducing document costs by up to 30%... and processing $421 billion dollars in accounts payables each year. helping thousands of companies simplify how work gets done. how's that for an encore? with xerox, you're ready for real business. [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ] come in. ♪ got the coffee. that was fast. we're outta here. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. th
to end the debate over whether to confirm hagel. rand paul telling cnn they need to hold democrats to a higher standard here. >> if they're got -- >> hagel's nomination made it out of the armed services committee on a party line vote. >>> general john allen may withdraw his nomination to become the supreme allied commander of nato. in fact, a staff member's written statement indicates he is considering taking a brake to reunite with his family, maybe even possibly retire. general allen spent 1 months directing nato forces against taliban insurgents. last year embarrassing e-mails with jill kelly came to light during cia director's sex scandal. >>> there was emphasis on the staging. students here are actually on winter break this week. the principal e-mailed parents offering a one-day experience mimicking a normal school day to coincide with the president's visit. >> if you're in preschool i bet you don't mind seeing the president. it's not a hardship to spend a day with the president. >> i bet not. >>> his hostage ordeal is over but the lingering effects are certainly not over. com
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)